Hoop 3 Halfway to Surgery

November 22, 2015

The third hoop was basically about understanding fat content in foods. The learning entailed what, ideally, to look for when choosing foods. The fat to calorie ratio should be about 25% or less of the calorie content.  For example, for every 100 calories, 25 of the calories or less should be from fat.  Can I just say, blah?  So, so tedious.  What’s ironic is, I can handle tedious tasks in many areas of my life, but for some reason, becoming a Buffy-the-Label-Slayer, is not my idea of exciting, not. at. all. Buffy’s adventures were much more exciting slayin’ the vampires and whatnot.  So, am I going to search every single label for the 25% or less fat to calorie ratio? No, I’m not. Because I’m a rebel like that.  There are other things to consider: sodium content, carbohydrates, sugars, gluten content, MSG, preservatives, and oh, so much more!  This can feel debilitating, which is why we often go back to what we like, for me, that’s Laughing Cow Spicy Chipotle cheese and corn tortilla chips (these do not meet the fat to calorie ratio, but they’re good, and crunchy, probably GMO and, did I say good?)

Feelings check:  How am I feeling about being halfway through the process of this Bariatric Surgery Quest?  Meh, it feels like hoop-jumping.  Unlike what I expected from these monthly group nutrition meetings, they’re pretty much about nutrition, that’s it.  No feelings, really.  No deep dark stuff.  Which for many in the group is probably a HUGE relief.  For me, I don’t mind digging through the deep dark stuff.  I guess that’s what 9 years of therapy prepared me for.  As a glutton for punishment (and food, I know you were thinkin’ it), I am going to go to at least one or two of the monthly support group meetings held at Lewis Hall at Arcadia Presbyterian Auditorium, more like a big office space with cushy meeting room chairs.  In this room, maybe there will be some deep dark processing of what it’s like to be overweight in a culture obsessed with body image.  Maybe we’ll explore what it feels like going under the knife to make our bodies more socially acceptable and healthy, according to the research. (My main motivation here.  I’d like to live longer.)

Maybe we’ll learn why we eat in excess and how to control that need to fill the empty feelings with food.  I have a feeling that none of this will happen.  Mostly, we’ll see real people, struggling with their number on the scale, wobbly knees and achy joints, trying to survive in the big scary world.  It will be full (heh-heh) of people with bigger sized waistbands, longing to feel connection and belonging.  If that’s what I experience at this support group, that will be worth it.  Connection.  That’s the stuff of real life.





 Picture credit www.theartleague.org